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Thursday, March 20, 2014

Another Pour

The concrete pump worked all night and had left by the time I arrived.
This was a ten hour pour.
Mr. Zamboni Man was smoothing things out.
Supports for the roof are being built in the labyrinth area.
I spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out what this center space is for.
At first I thought it was related to the fountain because this seems to be the correct area.  In a moment of clarity, though, I realized the fountain will be above ground.  The green rebar is around the area which will be an underground entrance to the pavilion.  The hole is the base for the elevator in the pavilion, and that building will be two levels.
This banner along the construction fence shows the pavilion on the right.  The new temple is on the left.  A fountain is in the center, but it's hard to see.
I took a close-up view.
This fountain is from a different banner.  This 3-D model shows both.
I noticed a design in the concrete of the stairwell on the left.  Can you see the diagonal line?
I zoomed in to get a better look, but there was a form in the way.
My camera managed to capture this view from the far end of the south lot.  This appears to be part of a master plan. Rebar is sticking straight out from this line.  The lotus blossom caps protect against injury.
This styrofoam at the end of the south lot will go under the stairs.
Once the roof is poured over the area next to the temple, scaffolding for the brick restoration can be built on this side.
I keep asking, and I keep getting told that if the weather warms up enough, they won't need to cover the scaffolding with plastic sheeting.  On this first day of spring, I remain hopeful.  And before the end of the day, these concrete blankets will cover the new pour.
Part of the brick restoration work includes repairing the niches plus the wainscoting around the entire base of the temple.  The niches were originally filled in with plaster.  The wainscoting is not stone, as you might think at first glance.  It is also plaster.  The restoration people are going to replace the plaster with limestone in both these areas.  It will be magnificent.
Have you heard that Mr. Crane's time of service is about up?  Releasing a crane is like releasing a bishop.  They both get dismantled.
With no crane support on the north side, much of the equipment we have seen there will be moved to the underground parking garage.  Of course, the garage will have to be cleaned out a bit.
Since Monday, the steeple has received a layer of plywood sheathing, and now a water and ice barrier is in place.  Slate shingles are next.
After that, it's anyone's guess what they'll work on.

7 comments:

JayBingham said...

I am interested in the curiously curved forms and the area that they enclose that appears in the second photo. It looks like the area inside that form did not get concrete poured into it. Do you have any information on why the form is curved?
It is also interesting that the fountain is rendered differently in the two renderings. Looks like maybe two different architects did the renderings. I am certainly curious to see what the actual fountain will look like.

Julie said...

I have been told that those two little oval shapes will still be visible when this area is completed. They did receive concrete, but it's not finished. As for the fountain, I have a favorite. We'll see if it's the one picked.

Julie said...

Jay, I have an update. The area between the pavilion and the underground entrance to the temple will be filled with paver stones, including those two oval spots.

JayBingham said...

Ok, that makes sense. Now that you mention it I can see that there is concrete in the area, but that it is lower than the surrounding area. that all adds up to having pavers in that area. I am sure it will look nice.
I have a favorite of the two depicted options for the fountain. I think that my favorite will go nicely with a Victorian pavilion. I will let you guess which one it is. Of course, since they are architectural renderings that does not mean that the end result will be exactly like either of the two that are depicted.
Thanks so much for your diligence in keeping us updated on this marvelous project.

Julie said...

We agree on the fountain!

JayBingham said...

Julie,
I noticed in the third photo the caption says: "Mr. Zamboni Man was smoothing things out." I recall you mentioning the name Zamboni in some other posts, this is the first time I recall you identifying what you were calling a Zamboni. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
Now it is perhaps my turn to clear something up for you. The machine in the photo is called, in the concrete industry, a power trowel among other names. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_trowel for additional names for this device, none of which are a Zamboni. Unfortunately none of the names are as exciting sounding as the name Zamboni, except perhaps whirlybird.
What the fellow in the photo is doing is troweling or floating the concrete to produce a smooth finish. It is an important step because it pushes the aggregate just below the surface. If it is done too much the the surface will chip off in a few years. You have probably seen that on sidewalks around Provo. Before the invention of this machine and even today for small jobs this is done by hand with a piece of equipment called a float, which is basically a flat piece of wood or metal about 8 inches wide and about 4 feet long that is attached to a long handle about 10 feet long.
I know that you are curious and want to get the right names associated with equipment, so I thought I would help you out.
The objective of a Zamboni (ice resurfacer is the generic name for one of these) and of the float step in pouring concrete is much the same, producing a smooth finish, so it is easy to see how one might think that they would be called the same thing. The big difference between them is that an ice resurfacer actually removes a bit of ice from the surface before spreading a thin film of hot water on the ice to provide a new surface, while a float or trowel pushes the rocks that would mar the finish below the surface to produce the smooth surface.
By the way there is an excellent article about Frank Zamboni and his ice resurfacing machine at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_resurfacer
Again thanks for all you do.

Julie said...

Thanks, Jay. Sometimes at the end of the post I go for succinct. However, I know that readers are always interested in details like this. I appreciate your help.